Top 5 Old Time Radio Christmas Programs

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Top 5 Old Time Radio Christmas Programs*

(*That are available for listening to on YouTube)

People even celebrated Christmas in the olden days – before cable TV, HD TV sets, DVDs, Bluerays and hand-held video players. Click on the titles to go and listen – and many of the links are only Part 1 of the particular program, so please be sure to listen to the other parts available at the YouTube site.

Superman’s Christmas Message – 1945

 

Bing Crosby Christmas Show – 1946

 

A Christmas Story – Jean Shepherd – 1974

 

Christmas Shopping – Abbott and Costello – 1945

 

A Christmas Carol – Mercury Players – 1939

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More Christmas Novelty Recordings

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The Sublime, and the Sublimely Bizarre

Because so many deserving recordings were left off the Top 5 list.(Click on the individual song titles to hear the recordings)

The Yogi Yorgensson Ouvre:

I Yust Go Nuts at Christmas

Yingle Bells

I Was Santa Claus at the Schoolhouse (for the P.T.A.)

The Christmas Party

” ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas” by:

Art Carney

Liberace

David Hasselhoff

Henry Rollins

John Cleese

Songs about the 1914 Christmas Truce:

Christmas 1914 In No-Man’s Land” – Mike Harding

Christmas in the Trenches” – John McCutcheon

Snoopy’s Christmas” – The Royal Gardsmen

A Red Sovine Classic:

Billy’s Christmas Wish”

More:

“The Twelve Pains of Christmas” – Bob Rivers

Christmas Balls” – Ben Light and his Surf Club Boys

” ‘Zat You, Santa Claus?” – Louis Armstrong

Everywhere It’s Christmas” – The Beatles (1966 Fan Club Record)

Santa and the Purple People Eater” – Sheb Wooley

Donde Esta Santa Claus?” – Augie Rios

Monster’s Holiday” – Lon Chaney Jr

Christmas Boogie” – Canned Heat with The Chipmunks

Linus and Lucy” – Vince Guaraldi (from A Charlie Brown Christmas Special)

The Littlest Christmas Tree” – Red Skelton

White Christmas” – Walter Brennan

All I Want For Christmas is a Beatle” – Dora Bryan

I Want A Beatle For Christmas” -Becky Lee Beck

“An Old Fashioned Christmas (Daddy’s Home)” – Linda Bennett

Santa Claus is a Black Man” – Akim

Happy Birthday Jesus” – Little Cindy

Top 5 Christmas Novelty Recordings

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Top 5 Christmas Novelty Recordings

There is never a greater need for a sense of humor than during the Christmas Holiday season. Over the years many recording artists, the famous and the obscure, have done their best to carve out a few minutes within which we can take a breath and laugh as we are dragged into the desperate, eccentric follies of the modern Christmas Celebration. Here are some examples to get you started – leave your own favorite Christmas Novelty recordings in the comments.

5. Santa Claus and his Old Lady – Cheech and Chong (1971). “The Christmas Story” for the Stoner Generation. This single by the famous counter-culture comedy duo made the Billboard Christmas Chart for three years running – #4(’71) and #3(’72 & ‘73) – and is still dragged out and dusted off annually at most AOR stations.

4. I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas – Gayla Peevey (1953). This is one of those recordings for which there seems to be no middle ground: one either loves it, or one hates it. Sung by 10-year-old Gayla Peevey (who in 1960 recorded the song “My Little Marine” using the name Jamie Horton), the song reached #24 on the Billboard Pop charts. The recording often appears on various Internet sites mislabeled as being performed by Shirley Temple.

3. (Tie)“Green Chri$tma$”(1958) & “Christmas Dragnet”(1953) – Stan Freberg. “Green Christmas” is a brilliant satire of the advertising profession and the commercialization of Christmas by the same. Borrowing from Dickens, Scooge is the COB of a large advertising firm, who is confronted by Bob Cratchit, the owner of a small spice company who is resisting the push to use Christmas as an advertising bonanza. Many of the most prominent products being hawked in a Holiday vein at that time (Coca-Cola, Chesterfield cigarettes, etc…) were slyly parodied, and subsequently many advertisers of the day refused to have their commercials air anytime the record was played and as a result the record received no commercial airplay. Nevertheless, the record sold, and there was a newspaper report on December 27, 1958, that the day after Christmas of 1958, Stan Freberg presented a check for $1,000 to the Hemophilia Foundation of Southern California as his royalties from the first year’s release of “Green Chri$tma$.” He gave all royalties from the song to charities to quell any criticism that he was profiting hypocritically from the subject of his satire. “Christmas Dragnet” is a terrific parody of the then popular police drama starring Jack Webb, and is almost as funny as the real Christmas episode from the TV show.

2. A Christmas Carol – Tom Lehrer (1959). Piano-playing humorist Tom Lehrer also found the overt commercialism of Christmas a fat target for his incisive musical wit. His nightclub act at the time consisted predominantly of satirical takes on different popular song forms, and his “A Christmas Carol” combines a merry original song with snippets of familiar Holiday hymns and carols featuring reworked lyrics reflecting the unabashed marketing and consumerism that was suffocating the Holiday even in the 1950s.

1.The  Twelve Gifts of Christmas” Allan Sherman (1963).The late, great Allan Sherman – King of the Song Parody – gave us this reworking of the interminable old workhorse “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” and saw it rise to #5 on the Billboard charts in 1963 and back again to #32 in 1965. Though some of the gift items listed in this 47-year-old recording might require a brief history lesson for some young listeners of today, the Christmas Bacchanalia Theme will be universally recognizable, and the gross Holiday Materialism of 1963 seems somewhat quaint by modern day standards. It’s amazing – and sad – what we can become accustomed to.

Top 5 Christmas Recordings of the Rock And Roll Era

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Top 5 Christmas Recordings of the Rock And Roll Era

Whether in the car, office, department store or the home, Radio provides the soundtrack for the Holiday Season so often and for so many. Here is my list of the Top 5 Singles released during the Rock And Roll era. The recordings included are not necessarily Rock And Roll music. I just wanted to limit my choices a bit. So much Christmas themed music has been released every Fall and Winter for the past century, that narrowing the list of favorites down to less than half a dozen would be like trying to pick your favorite 5 hairs on your head (regrettably much easier when it comes to my head).

5.“The Little Drummer Boy” – Harry Simeone Chorale (1958). Aside from a triangle or two, just human voices heard on this popular recording. This song is the English translation of a Czech carol titled “The Carol of the Drum.” The recording was released every Christmas season from 1958 to 1962, and made the top 40 each of those years.

4. “White Christmas” – The Drifters (1954 & 1955). The rockin’ Doo Wop version of the Christmas Pop standard was recorded by the original Drifters with Clyde McPhatter late in 1953. It hit #2 on the Billboard R&B charts in 1954 and entered the Pop charts in 1955. In 1957 Elvis Presley recorded a version of “White Christmas” heavily influenced by the Drifters’ single, and this one caught the attention of the song’s composer, Irving Berlin, who hated Presley’s rendition and waged a serious campaign to try and get radio stations to ban the Presley version. He was unsuccessful, the Elvis Presley “White Christmas” single topped the Billboard charts, and the royalty checks rolled on in.

3. “The Christmas Song” – Nat King Cole (1946 & 1960). Written one hot July day by Mel Torme’ and Bob Wells, who were just trying to see if they could mentally cool themselves off by writing about a different season, this modern standard was originally recorded in 1946 by the Nat King Cole Trio. Nat rerecorded the song in 1953 with Nelson Riddle’s string arrangement. The orchestral version was released in 1960, only spent a couple of weeks on the Billboard charts, but that was all it needed to earn a Gold Record. Often called/referred to by it’s first line, “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire…

2. “Happy Xmas (War is Over) – John Lennon and Yoko Ono (1971). In 1969 the Lennons put up billboard advertisements in major cities around the world that stated simply: “War is Over! (If You Want It).” This became the theme around which John Lennon composed an anti-war Christmas song. Recorded with the Harlem Community Choir and produced by Phil Spector (who’s own legendary Christmas Album suffered the fate of having been released the very same day President Kennedy was assassinated, and was quickly pulled from release), the single did not initially chart well. But as with so many records with a short but annual shelf life, it sold much better the following year. It has since been covered by a wide variety of musical artists, and the original recording is regularly heard on radio and TV whenever the Christmas Season rolls around.

1. “Merry Christmas Baby” – Johnny Moore’s Three Blazers (1947).  Slightly pre-dating what is generally accepted to be “the Rock And Roll era,” this influential 1947 composition was and continues to be covered by nearly every performer who feels a need for a Christmas song in their set list whenever December rolls around. It’s been recorded by such authentic artists as Chuck Berry, Bonnie Raitt and Otis Redding, as well as wanna-be artists like Jessica Simpson, Christina Aguilera and Hanson. For the original recording Johnny Moore stacked things in his favor by hiring guitarist Oscar Moore of the Nat King Cole Trio, and singer/pianist Charles Brown. The single reached #3 on the Billboard R&B charts.